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Operate machinery, install power systems, or create something new as a skilled craft professional.

Rigger

Do you love to work outdoors? Are you interested in practical physics? If so, then rigging may be the career for you. Riggers attach loads of construction equipment to cranes or structures using cables, pulleys and winches. Riggers use various suspension techniques to get their load around obstacles on a construction site to the desired location.

Qualifications: Riggers need to have good depth perception, manual dexterity, good judgement and decision making skills.

Education
: Most employers require a high school diploma or equivalent and on-the-job training. One to two years of classroom and on-the-job training is common.

Average Salary: $53,352 Annual; $25.65  Hourly (Source: Build Your Future)

Millwright

Are you interested in the construction and maintenance of a variety of machines and equipment? If so, then being a millwright may be for you. Millwrights install, align and level a wide range of heavy machinery like pumps and conveyor belts.

Education: Most employers require a high school diploma or equivalent and on-the-job training. Most millwrights complete apprenticeship programs that combine classroom instruction and paid on the job training. Apprenticeship programs typically take several years to complete and train prospective millwrights on erecting, moving, repairing, and dismantling machinery.

Qualifications: Millwrights must have mechanical aptitude, a solid understanding of how complicated machines are constructed, knowledge of the load-bearing capabilities of the equipment they use as well as an understanding of blueprints and technical instructions. They must be able to follow and give detailed instruction and be accurate and precise in their work.

Average Salary: $61,253 Annual; $29.45 Hourly (Source: Build Your Future)

Go to the Craft Labor Map to learn how many millwrights will be needed in your state over the next three years.

Instrumentation Technician

Are you a problem solver with a talent for details? If so, then instrumentation technology may be the career for you. Instrument technicians perform installation and maintenance functions and are trained in piping, tubing, fasteners and metallurgy. They must be familiar with electrical systems, craft-specific drawings, and with the hand and power tools specific to their trade.

Qualifications: Instrumentation technicians have good manual dexterity, hand-eye coordination, physical fitness, and sense of balance. Instrumentation technicians also need to have the ability to solve complex problems using reasoning and advanced math.

Education: Most employers require a high school diploma or equivalent and on-the-job training. Three to four years of classroom and on-the-job training is common.

Average Salary: $67,823 Annual; $32.61 Hourly (Source: Build Your Future)

Go to the Craft Labor Map to learn how many instrumentation technicians will be needed in your state over the next three years.

Heavy Equipment Operator

Do you want to operate heavy equipment in engineering and construction projects? Heavy equipment operators clear and grade land for the construction of roads, buildings, and bridges, manufacturing facilities, power generation facilities, dams, levees, and other structures. A heavy equipment operator operates heavy equipment used in engineering and construction projects.

Painter

Do you have an artistic side? Professional painters balance applying just the right paint, stain, varnish or other finish to buildings and industrial structures. Professional painters specialize in everything from industrial spray painting to prevent deterioration in buildings to decorative artisans who create faux finishes.

Crane Operator

Want a career that allows you to use state-of-the-art heavy machinery to move massive materials? Using a series of joysticks, levers, and pedals, crane operators use their knowledge of load calculations to place materials around a construction site. Crane Operators operate outside, often on 10-hour shifts.

Electrician

Do you like tinkering with wires, sound systems and robotics? Electricians install and maintain the electrical power systems for our homes, businesses and factories. In addition, they repair and upgrade electrical machines. Electricians work both indoors and outdoors and typically follow a shift work pattern that can include working weekends and holidays.

Ironworker

Want to create something new or restore something old? Building everything from skyscrapers to bridges, ironworkers construct the skeleton of a structure that allows other trades to install their work. Ironworkers set machinery, create structural steel and curtain walls and operate power hoists and forklifts in the building process. They also have extensive knowledge about safety procedures to mitigate risk.

Maintenance Contractor and Inspector

Do you like problem-solving? Maintenance contractors are responsible for the everyday upkeep of equipment, screening work orders and assembling, installing and repairing mechanical, HVAC, rigging, hydraulics and electrical control systems. In addition to general maintenance, they read blueprints and identify potential safety hazards. Inspectors perform tests, document conditions and check equipment to ensure it is up to industry standards and codes. Maintenance contractors and inspectors work both indoors and outdoors, alone and as a team. Shifts are typically Monday-Friday for 10 hours a day; however, some overtime and weekends may be required.

Process Technician

Want to design, control and operate specialized processes for a petrochemical plant or refinery? Process technicians are responsible for the safe and reliable operation of refineries and petrochemical plants. Technicians are familiar with electrical systems and are experts in the safe use of hand and power tools. Process technicians work as part of a team, both indoors and outside, on a shift schedule that includes nights, weekends and holidays.

Welder

Do you enjoy solving puzzles and putting things together? Welders apply heat and pressure to join objects. Through knowledge of welding principals and metals, welders use blueprints and drawings to build everything from ships to factories. There are many types of welders, including production welder, fabricators, pipefitters, and structural welders.